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Posts Tagged ‘travel nursing’

On September 10, 2001, as I crossed the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge, I looked to my right for a final glimpse of the cityscape. Since I’d moved away, the Manhattan skyline had become synonymous with “home.” From an eastbound viewpoint, it signified that I was almost there. And any time I traveled the bridge to return to Maryland, it represented the loved ones and lifestyle I would soon miss again.

The following morning—around 8:30 am on 9/11—I chatted breezily with my Healthcare Traveler colleagues about the John Mellencamp concert I’d attended at Jones Beach on September 9th. Not more than 20 minutes later, one of them abruptly swept back into my cubicle.

“Bobbi!” said Carolyn. “The news is on in the conference room. A plane just crashed into one of the buildings at the World Trade Center!”

I followed her to the area where a number of our coworkers had already congregated. As we stood there watching the live coverage, I wondered how the jet could have gotten so horribly off course. And I felt sick when I thought about the people on the affected floors of the tower who, like us, had just started their workday.

Then the second plane hit.

Oh, no, I thought in stunned silence, trying to process it all. This is deliberate.

I felt a sense of urgency in wanting to be near family and friends so I drove back to New York on September 14th. As I crossed the bridge into Brooklyn and looked at the skyline, I had to catch my breath. There was a large plume of white smoke hugging the area where the towers once stood. And while the vista still signified home, it was one of the most heartbreaking sights I’d ever seen.

I interviewed an RN and a CST who had been on assignment at two different New York City hospitals on that tragic day. Like so many in the New York metropolitan area, they wanted to do more.

Cover of the Nov/Dec 2001 issue of Healthcare Traveler

Dee, the nurse, donated blood and walked around the city for 9 hours handing out food, water, gloves, and masks with a colleague. Jason, the surgical technologist, volunteered at Chelsea Pier — where a triage center and ORs had been set up — and participated in a “bucket brigade” at Ground Zero.

Every year, in addition to remembering those lost on 9/11, I think about Dee and Jason—as well as the firefighters, police officers, paramedics, civilians, and other clinicians—who went above and beyond to help those directly affected by the unforgettable tragedy. Compassionate and dedicated, these exceptional healthcare travelers were a shining example of the inherent goodness in most people. And their selfless acts, along with those of countless others, provided a sense of comfort and community during a time of shock and overwhelming sadness.

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As we honor the memory of those who lost their lives and those who volunteered their support and skills, we invite you to share your thoughts and comments here on our blog or via Facebook, Twitter, and/or Pinterest.

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Happy Labor Day, everyone! While everyone’s favorite September holiday tips its hat to the economic and social contributions of American workers, it also also signifies the unofficial end of summer/beginning of fall. And of course, it is often celebrated with friends and family, and a variety of food-related festivities—from brunches and barbecues to potluck suppers and picnics.

As a traveler, you get to experience new beginnings every 13 weeks or so. You also have the opportunity to try regional fare and unique dining options in countless locations throughout the U.S. and beyond. Odds are you’ve discovered some pretty amazing and tasty treats along the way. You know, the kind of stuff you may never have stumbled upon if it weren’t for your mobile career.

We would love to hear about your picks for the best restaurants and takeout places in your assignment communities. We’d also like to learn about great eateries you’ve discovered en route to a contract destination.

To kick things off, I thought I’d tell you about one of my favorite haunts in New York City. If you find yourself in or close to the Big Apple during a travel assignment, consider a trip to Britain. No, that’s not a typo; I’m talking about Little Britain, the wonderfully Anglo-centric slice of the city’s West Village. It’s where you’ll find Tea & Sympathy.

Tea & Sympathy (right), situated in New York’s West Village.

For more than 20 years, owners Nicky Perry and Sean Kavanagh-Dowsett have provided New Yorkers and out-of-towners with the opportunity to enjoy a “proper cuppa” and traditional English fare. Once you set foot in this charming, authentic British café, you will be swiftly and happily transported to Dear Old Blighty. The atmosphere is intimate and cozy, the service impeccable, and all of the staff hail from the United Kingdom.

My recommendations? A proper bacon butty with HP brown sauce and of course, Tea & Sympathy’s famous scones with raspberry jam and clotted cream. As you may expect, there are a plethora of options for tea lovers, from black currant, to Chai, to my pick, Typhoo.

A delicious bacon butty!

Tea & Sympathy’s famous scones with raspberry jam and clotted cream. Yum!

A variety of teas in the sweetest little teapots.

Tea & Sympathy also serves spot on bangers and mash, and the best treacle pudding this side of Tooting Broadway. Located at 108 Greenwich Avenue, it is open Monday through Friday, 11:30 am to 10:30 pm, and Saturday and Sunday from 9:30 am to 10:30 pm.

Happy travels,

Bobbi

Bobbi Harrison is content channel manager for Healthcare Traveler and LocumLife.

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Like to recommend a great place for a bite? Contact Bobbi Harrison at bharrison@advanstar.com.

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This just in…Healthcare Traveler (HT) is adding several new columns and departments to its print publication!

There will be an additional news section devoted entirely to those of you who are traveling rehab professionals. We also have a social networking department in the works and another that will bring you the latest on apps, sites, and technology to enhance your journeys. We’re even working on one that centers on your downtime.

What’s more, we are reintroducing a few of the tried-and-true, like Starter’s Kit, which covers the fundamentals of healthcare travel, and Travel Tips, to provide you with further resources and suggestions for success on the road.

You Said It, A Thousand Words, and In the Bag (formerly It’s in the Bag) are also making a comeback. As some of you may recall, your participation is essential to these three offerings. And to show our appreciation, if your contribution is used, you will be entered into a drawing to win a $25.00 Amazon gift card. To participate, you have to be a current healthcare traveler; to reacquaint you, here’s a quick overview of each.

You Said It: This column includes personal responses to a question posed by HT. Currently, we want to know: What is the best tip you ever received from an experienced healthcare traveler? Please e-mail your answers to me at bharrison@advanstar.com. If we publish your response, you will automatically be entered into a drawing for an Amazon gift card.

A Thousand Words: If you’ve taken a beautiful, funny, or heartwarming photo on the way to an assignment location/within your assignment community, we’d love to see it! As an example, here’s one that I took earlier this month on my way from New York to Cleveland…

This terminal was for the birds!

For consideration, e-mail your high-resolution photo to me at bharrison@advanstar.com and include a little background information, such as where the photo was taken and what it features, etc. If we publish your image, you’ll be entered into a drawing for an Amazon gift card.

In the Bag: When packing for a new assignment, what are some of your must-have items, the things you’d never leave home without? If you – and some of your stuff – would like to be highlighted in this department, please contact me at bharrison@advanstar.com. If you are featured, we will not only need your photo but may also request pictures of a few of the things you take, like a travel necessity or favorite object, and a little background info. And if you are selected for this department, you will automatically be entered into a drawing for an Amazon gift card.

Participating is super easy and a lot of fun. If you have any questions or would like additional information, just drop me a line. I look forward to hearing from you!

Happy travels,

Bobbi

Bobbi Harrison is content channel manager for Healthcare Traveler and LocumLife.

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Photo: Big Hassle

If being on the move is stressing you out, try creating a pick-me-up playlist to improve your mood and relieve tension.

Need a few recommendations?

Check out these tunes to help maintain your sanity while on the road.

Settle Down – No Doubt

The Southern California band is back and better than ever with this dancehall-inspired track. Sure, the chorus will get stuck in your head but just sway with the melody and go with it.

Roll Away Your Stone – Mumford & Sons

If you aren’t already acquainted with this indie favorite, there’s no better Mumford & Sons song to introduce you to the British folk rock band than “Roll Away Your Stone.” The tune is contagious and perfect for highway driving with the windows rolled down.

Lights – Ellie Goulding

Get your dance on with this radio darling that was a hit in the UK a whole two years before it caught the attention of music lovers Stateside. Ellie Goulding had the honor of performing at the wedding reception of Prince William and Kate Middleton so if she’s good enough for royalty, she’s good enough for your playlist.

Everybody Talks – Neon Trees

It’s nearly impossible to be in a bad mood while listening to the rockin’ feel-good tunes from Provo, Utah’s own Neon Trees. Upbeat and catchy, “Everybody Talks” is sure to be in heavy rotation on your MP3 player.

Unashamed Desire – Missy Higgins

Slow things down with this first single from Australian singer Missy Higgin’s latest disc The Ol’ Razzle Dazzle. Bluesy and emotional, you’ll love her powerful voice and confident lyrics.

Kelly Bryant is a freelance entertainment writer based in Los Angeles, California.

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Photo: Ben Sutherland via Flickr.com

Did you watch Ryan Lochte outswim Michael Phelps?

Or witness the U.S. men’s gymnastics team struggle only for the Fierce Five to dominate the women’s team event?

If you’re anything like the members of my family, you haven’t missed a single moment of the major Olympic events.

But for fans around the world, the stars of the 30th Modern Olympiad aren’t just in the pool, gym, or on the track. They compete in weight lifting, team handball, Judo, and other sports that may seem “less mainstream” to Americans. Still, these athletes are considered superstars in their home countries.

Here’s a glimpse at some of this year’s Olympic international all-stars.

Weightlifting

Photo: Greatist via Flickr.com

Don’t let Pimsiri Sirikaew’s height fool you. At 4’11”, the flight attendant from Thailand was a heavy favorite to medal. Her silver will surely earn as much honor as her teammate Prapawadee Jaroenrattanatarakoon’s 2008 gold medal.

Virtually unknown before 2008, Iranian champion Behdad Salimikordasiabi of the men’s competition has taken the winner’s podium in one international competition after another over the past four years. It’s no surprise that he dominated the Olympic stage, winning gold in the +105kg event.

Team Handball

Photo: SH Photography / hegi.info via Flickr.com

Ever heard of team handball? If you have, you can forget the one-on-one competitions you would typically see at gyms and playgrounds. This is a serious sport played by 800,000 teams in 183 countries, and is projected to be a major moneymaker in London.

If you’re planning on watch the event, don’t expect to cheer on Team USA because it’s the only entry in which Americans are not represented. Instead, you can root for Norway, Korea, Spain, or Montanegro, the semifinalists heading into the final week of competitions.

Judo

Phot0: Clicks2006 via Flickr.com

Historically, Japan has ruled this sport, but French heavyweight Teddy Riner took top honors.

Although she didn’t make it past the first round, Wojdan Shaherkani made history as the first woman from Saudi Arabia to compete. She even had competitors rally behind her to convince officials to permit her wearing a traditional headscarf during the match.

Their 15 minutes of fame

This is just a sampling of the many Olympic competitions going on right now. They may not always draw the biggest headlines, but for fans of the sport and from the 204 nations represented, it’s a moment in the international limelight.

Be sure to check out the August issue of Healthcare Traveler for a feature on mobile professionals who use assignments to participate in their sport of choice, such as marathons, CrossFit, and equestrian eventing.

Anne Baye Ericksen is a professional writer who has contributed to Healthcare Traveler since 1996. She resides with her family in Simi Valley, Calif.

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Photo: FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Every year, our family buys season tickets to Summer Lyric productions at Tulane University in New Orleans. For more than 45 years, they’ve been producing a made-in-America art form—musical theater.

We’ve seen singing nuns march down the aisles in “The Sound of Music,” and anxiously watched Norma Desmond—arms akimbo and eyes wide open—descend the staircase for her final close up in “Sunset Boulevard.”

Each season, three musicals are staged with a live orchestra and amazing casts. Attending these shows is one of the highlights of our summer.

Colleges across the country produce a wide range of theatrical performances from elaborate musicals and classic plays, to the avant-garde and absurd.

To find out what’s playing at a college near you, visit the university’s website and search for its theater or dramatic arts department.

The following schools have announced their 2012-2013 season:

Carnegie Mellon (CMU) — Pittsburgh, PA

The School of Drama Subscribers Series kicks off with a funny and sexy production of “The Rivals,” directed by a guest artist from Britain. The season also includes the Tony award winning “Angels in America, Part One: Millennium Approaches,” the new musical version of “Spring Awakening,” and three modernized versions of Shakespeare plays. Visit the CMU School of Drama website for more information.

Florida State University (FSU) — Tallahassee, FL

The MaGrath sisters are having a particularly bad day in the Pulitzer prize winning, “Crimes of the Heart.” Additional highlights of the season include: “How to Succeed in Business without Really Trying,” “The Monster Under the Bed,” and “Much Ado About Nothing.” Visit the FSU School of Theater website for more information.

California State University (CSU) — Fullerton, CA

Wacky wit and black humor skewers Mom and Dad in “Baby with the Bathwater,” the season opener at California State University. Ticket holders can also see a range of shows from the mature and daring “Metamorphoses,” to the classic musical “Carousel.” Visit the CSU Fullerton Department of Theater & Dance website for more information.

Jim Twardowski, BSN, RN, CMSRN, is a travel writer based in Louisiana. His work has been featured in AAA Home & AwayGlobal Traveler, and QUEST magazines.

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