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Archive for the ‘Healthcare Advice’ Category

Photo: dbking via Flickr.com

On Monday, March 26, the U.S. Supreme Court began hearing arguments regarding the Affordable Care Act’s mandate that every American purchase health insurance. Luckily, most staffing companies offer travelers employer-sponsored medical insurance. Still, that’s only one kind of insurance policy.

With auto, home, and renter’s insurance policies available for purchase, there are many types to protect you and your belongings.

For some insight into the finer points of insurance, and how to cater certain policies to a mobile lifestyle, insurance expert Valerie Vollmer offers the following advice.

Automobile

Driving to assignments every few months means spending more time behind the wheel than the average car owner. Vollmer suggests carrying full, comprehensive theft and vandalism, as well as collision with a low deductible. The more time your auto is out and about, the greater risk something could happen — like dings or accidents.

However, don’t neglect bodily injury and property damage liability. This not only covers you, the person you hit, and his/her passengers if they are injured in an accident, but having higher limits also protects your assets in the event that the other driver files a lawsuit against you. The damage element also reimburses others for any destruction of their property you caused.

Vollmer recommends travelers look for policies that provide a temporary rental car so you won’t be out of commission even if your vehicle is. These policies often include roadside services, too.

Recreational Vehicles

If you travel in a recreational vehicle or motor home, then you’re talking about another type of insurance altogether. Vollmer says to ask your agent about certain specifics, like what personal items are and are not covered. Are there comprehensive limits? Does it include breakdown services? Also, find out if a loss-of-use clause compensates you for temporary living accommodations.

Homeowner’s & Renter’s

If you own a home, you’re in luck. Homeowner’s insurance policies protect your belongings even if you are thousands of miles away on assignment. A notable exception is if you’ve turned your home into a rental property. If that’s the case, or if you don’t own a permanent residence, Vollmer suggests taking out a renter’s insurance policy at each new location. Generally speaking, this will replace items damaged or destroyed by burglary, water, smoke, and loss of use.

Travelers may also want to consider a personal article policy insuring valuables such as jewelry, cameras, and computers. However, cell phones, tablets, and e-readers aren’t usually covered.

Did you know that some carriers are dropping dog bite liability from homeowner’s policies? Other companies will exclude that coverage after the first incident. So before taking Fido on assignments, it’s important to know what is and isn’t included in your policy.

Stay tuned

Watch for the second half of this post next month, including tips on how to shop for insurance companies. Special thanks to Valerie Vollmer of Vollmer Insurance Services in Agoura Hills, Calif.

Anne Baye Ericksen has written for Healthcare Traveler since 1996. She resides with her family in Simi Valley, Calif. 

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A helpful new infographic has been circulating the web for those new to travel nursing and students aspiring to become one. The Student Guide to Travel Nursing is an easy-to-follow guide that details information on the required education, experience, and necessary skills to become a successful travel nurse.

According to Healthcare Traveler, the origin of the travel nursing industry occurred in 1978 when the city of New Orleans experienced a short-term population burst during Mardi Gras. A contract nurse was called in to help with the surge of partygoers.

Since then, the demand for travel nurses has been consistently high and has become a popular career choice for students due to its competitive benefits. Travel nurses get to explore the country, receive great pay, and gain valuable work experience — all while helping others.

The student guide is currently posted on the Medical Solutions website and is also available in a printable version.

Jeff Long is the Marketing Manager at Medical Solutions, a travel nursing company. He has never been a nurse and is not a recruiter; his goal is to help you meet your career goals by sharing information, advice, and the benefits of travel nursing with you. He also blogs regularly at TravelNursingBlogs.com.

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Photo: Peggy Clark

I really admire my parents. Even in their 70s they are more active than many twenty-somethings I know.

They walk three miles together nearly every day, which means jumping on the treadmill during harsh Wisconsin winters.

My mother regularly attends exercise classes, and my dad is Mr. Outdoorsman regardless of the season.

I’m very thankful they are blessed with good health, but I often think about the day when they will require help attending to their healthcare.

For me, the hardest part of that scenario is living 2,000 miles away and being unable to be as hands-on as much as they may need. As mobile professionals, you too can understand the frustrations of being away from loved ones in need.

According to the American Society on Aging, approximately 100 million people deal with chronic conditions and nearly 25 percent of all households care for a family member age 50 or older. Now think about how those numbers will escalate as baby boomers age and require more services.

More and more of us will become caregivers for loved ones.

But you don’t have to permanently unpack in order to become involved. Of course, ideally, family members and trusted friends living close by could pitch in, but there are experts who can advocate in your place if that’s not a viable option.

A Geriatric Care Manager (GCM) is typically a nurse or social worker trained to address the multifaceted nature of elder care. They assess individuals’ physical and psychological well-being, address family dynamics, and connect people to local resources. In fact, GCMs are very well connected with senior centers, assisted living facilities, home care organizations, and other local experts including financial and legal advisors.

GCMs also stay current with clients’ lives, so they notice when subtle changes might indicate something larger at play, or when extra services or attention is required. They can be your eyes and ears on the scene.

So how do you find a Geriatric Care Manager? The National Association of Professional Geriatric Care Managers has compiled a membership database. Just type your zip code, city, or state into its Find a Care Manager Search engine. The results supply you with names, contact information, and areas of expertise for local geriatric care managers.

For now, I value my parents’ vitality because it allows them to enjoy their hobbies and interests. At the same time, it’s reassuring to know that a trained advocate is available for us when needed.

Special thanks to Andrea Gallagher at Senior Concerns.

Anne Baye Ericksen is a freelance writer based in Simi Valley, Calif.

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